Drug Rehabilitation Information – How to Treat Drug Addiction

Habitual compulsive over use of certain drugs is drug abuse. Severe complications leading to lots of fatalities result from drug abuse. How to treat drug addiction is what this article is all about.

To start this article let me say first hand that it is not only illegal drugs that are abused by people, prescription or over-the-counter drugs are also commonly abused. Though addictions catches up with most drug abusers, some people abuse drugs for some time without being addicted to them. Some people are most unfortunate to, in addition to drug actions, get down with some terrible adverse side effects.

Drug abuse is usually triggered by emotional instability of the abuser aroused by external influences that could be from friends, relatives or colleagues. Complete derangement of the victim are some of the side effects of drug abuse.

When treating drug abuse effort should be made to determine whether any or all of those influences are present in order to deal with it so that treatment for your drug addiction will be successful. The conditions of drug abusers are not the same , so also are the diagnosis and treatment.

The therapist following the initial interview with the patient should find out enough information to help decide the proper course of treatment to follow, the type of drugs that are suitable, dosage, duration of use, the anticipated effects including side effect. Your social needs should be put into consideration: who should visit and who should be barred. Specialist advise that only very close relatives who are not abusing drugs should be allowed near you while undergoing drug rehabilitation.

Another important factor that you must cooperate with the therapist to identify is your true personality, your spirituality and religion or otherwise. The therapist may also want to know how close your drug supplier to the rehab and who he or she is so that the facility can keep them away from you.

After all the preliminaries have been taken care of, detoxification is the first treatment you begin to receive to remove traces of the drug from your system. Your blood is primarily targeted with detoxification medications to rid them of traces of the drug. Drugs addictions are not like alcohol addiction, which mere abstinence can wean an abuser from it. A lot of work is usually called in rehabilitating a drug abuser. For instance cases if you are being rehabilitated from cocaine or LSD abuse your therapy could include the allowance of Small amounts of the particular, which will continuously be scaled down till you are weaned from its use.

The aim of an inpatient rehab program is to help you stay off drug in a secured environment so that you will completely be relieved of the drug craving and become sober.

Because rehabilitation for drug addiction is not an easy procedure, you should only entrust yourself to a notable rehab center with a track record of successful rehabilitation. A quality rehab center will do more than just wean you from drug abuse, they should be able to completely turn your shattered life around for good.

Drug Abuse Treatment Centers

Choosing a drug treatment center can be one of the most crucial decisions of your life. It is of vital importance that you consider a few factors before arriving at a decision.

Drug abuse is a disease that requires a doctor specializing in addiction medicine to make an accurate diagnosis and prescribe the most appropriate treatment. You must ensure that a drug abuse treatment center can offer a variety of treatment programs that meet your needs. These programs may comprise inpatient, residential, outpatient, and/or short-stay options. Then another important question arises: how much does a drug treatment center cost? The price tag for treatment is presented in many kinds of formats. You must have a clear idea of what is included, what will be added to your bill as a fee-for-service program, and what services will be covered by your health insurance.

Inquire if the center has provisions for on-site medical care. It is advantageous, since physicians and nurses provide 24-hour hospital services to monitor and ensure a safe withdrawal from drugs. Check the center’s medical credentials and accreditation.

Do not forget to ask which medical costs are included in the price of treatment at the center. As family involvement is a crucial component of recovery, ask if there is any time devoted to family programs, and if group therapy is included. Keep in mind that drug rehabilitation treatment programs should include a continuing care program that supports and monitors recovery.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides on-line resources for locating drug and alcohol abuse treatment programs. The Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator lists private and public facilities that are licensed, certified, or otherwise approved for inclusion by their state substance abuse agency

All information in the locator is completely updated each year, based on facility responses to SAMHSA’s National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services. New facilities are added monthly. Updates to facility names, addresses, and telephone numbers are made monthly, if facilities inform SAMHSA of changes.

Drug Abuse and the Gender Gap

Usage rates for prescription drugs continue to rise with nearly 3 in 5 Americans taking prescription drugs including antidepressants and opioids.

In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers found that prescription drug usage among people 20 and older had risen to 59 percent from 51 percent just a dozen years earlier and it was rising at a faster rate than ever before. During the same period, the percentage of people taking five or more prescription drugs nearly doubled, to 15 percent from 8 percent.

Effects of Gender on Addiction

It is no surprise then that the non-medical use of prescription drugs including painkillers, tranquilizers, and sedatives continue to be a growing problem in the United States. Statistics show men abuse prescription drugs at a higher rate than women, however, the gap between the genders is narrowing. Females age 12 to 17 are less likely to take abuse prescription drug and abuse and distribution is much higher in males of the same age range, according to a recent government study on Gender Medicine. The same report shows that young adult females show a higher percentage rate of addiction to cocaine and prescription drugs even though males in that age group abuse those drugs more frequently and take them in larger amounts.

Disturbingly, more recent statistics show that overdose deaths among young women are increasing, especially those who become addicted to opioids. The CDC Vital Signs reported that deaths from opioid overdose among women have increased 400 percent since 1999. By comparison, young men of the same age group suffered fatal opioid overdoses by approximately 265 percent in that same time frame. The CDC has estimated that as many as 18 women in the United States die every day from an opioid drug overdose, most of which were obtained by prescription.

To continue the disturbing downtrend of drug abuse according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, women are less likely to receive adequate treatment for substance abuse than men. Studies show that women are less likely than men to be placed in a specialized but are often treated by primary care providers or through mental health programs instead. Women also face more obstacles that are an impediment to their treatment, such as lower incomes, the possibility of pregnancy, and the need for childcare. In addition, women show more of a tendency to hide their substance abuse for a variety of reason including fear of social stigma, loss of child custody, or repercussions from a partner or spouse.

In the past, studies in drug addiction was from a male perspective for both males and females and drug abuse prevention programs and rehab facilities were designed with an emphasis on the needs of males. In comparison, outreach campaigns, preventive education, and drug rehab today is tailored to address the needs of both men and women as the scientific and medical community become more informed about how and why these addiction patterns occur in both men and women.

With gender roles playing a role in addiction, Gender-specific treatment programs provide a respite from the social stressors of everyday life. Patients can focus on their recovery without the distraction of the opposite sex. Studies show that both men and women feel more comfortable communicating about issues like sexuality, social prejudice, and domestic abuse with members of their own gender.

Both men and women suffering from opiod addiction, both can benefit from comprehensive rehabilitation programs that focus on the full range of care required to be free from addiction. These programs take a patient from detox to residential treatment, partial hospitalization, outpatient services, and transitional living. Effective treatment therapies include:

  • Fitness training
  • Experimental and holistic modalities
  • Follow up programs
  • Family or marriage counseling
  • Nutritional counceling

Having the support of a highly trained, multidisciplinary staff can help individuals of both genders recover from the disease of addiction and regain hope for the future.

According to a SAMHSA report in 2014, men are more likely than women to use all types of illegal drugs that result in emergency department visits or overdose deaths. These drugs include marijuana (according to federal law) and the misuse of prescription drugs. Men in most age groups have a higher rate of use and dependence on illicit drugs and alcohol than do women. However, women are just as likely as men to become addicted but are more likely to become addicted to prescription drugs and illegal drugs. Women are also more susceptible to craving and relapse which are key phases of the addiction cycle.

Going even further in their research SAMHSA found that women of color may face other unique issues with regard to drug use and treatment needs. For example, African-American and American Indian/Alaska Native women are more likely than women of other racial and ethnic groups to be victims of rape, physical violence, and stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime-issues that are risk factors for substance use and should be addressed during treatment.

In addition to drug abuse be affected by personality traits, research has shown that in most instances women use drugs differently, respond to drugs differently, and often have unique obstacles that prevent them from receiving effective treatment. Some of these obstacles being as simple as not being able to find child care or being prescribed treatment that has not been adequately tested on women.

Researchers continue to study to learn more about the differing factors that attribute to drug addiction in males and females. As they are able to effectively identify these factors, the medical community more able to develop programs to increase an individual’s chance of breaking free from addictive lifestyles.

They are learning that the physical and mental differences of both men and women contribute how they are introduced abuse an individual’s ability to be successful in a treatment program

In a July 2016 article CNN reported that:

“according to a report released by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, worldwide, drug use has remained steady over the past four years,. However, researchers found that heroin use in the United States is up 145% since 2007.”

One in 20 adults — roughly a quarter of a billion people between ages 15 and 64 — used at least one illegal or improperly used drug in 2014, according to the World Drug Report 2016. Though the numbers have not grown in proportion to the global population, new trends have developed, including increased sales in anonymous online marketplaces.

The U.N. researchers also reported gender differences in drug use. Men are three times more likely than women to use cannabis, cocaine or amphetamines, while women are more likely to take opioids and tranquilizers for non-medical purposes.